Permanent pandemic practices for the good

Saskatchewan has entered step three of our reopening plan and most restrictions from public health orders have been lifted.

But does that mean we should all go back to business as usual?

I think there are a few pandemic measures we could all just continue with.

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Prairieland won’t be saddled with losing bet

Administration at Prairieland Park has disclosed they have endured ongoing losses at Marquis Downs over $500,000 annually during the last five years prior to the pandemic. 

With no place to relocate, this will effectively end professional horse racing in Saskatchewan.

There seem to be a lot of mistruths circulating about whether or not Prairieland has the authority to discontinue the sport on their site.

You bet they can.

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Moe’s plan to re-open SK for business

Saskatchewan’s premier Scott Moe is optimistically eying reopening our province (again) to business despite some of our neighbouring provinces tightening down.

As much as I strongly believe safety is a high priority, I also believe salvaging our economy is just as important.

So what does Moe’s re-open plan mean for business?

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All will be revealed in Regina land sale

Regina City Council was publicly criticized last week for a land sale they engaged in with an undisclosed buyer.

Some of the outcry is from adjacent property owners who may or may not have had use for the land themselves.

But any criticism from the general public about the cloak and dagger secrecy of the sale may not be fair.

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Density can’t come at the expense of massive property devaluation

Cities are becoming increasingly aware of the need to densify.

The infrastructure costs of suburban sprawl are not recoverable.

No one is prepared to pay the real costs that are imposed upon most city services because of continued expansion of suburbia.

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How smart companies will address work-from-home

Smart companies will look beyond potential cost savings and base their decision on how to best invest in their most important asset…their employees.

I’m often asked what I believe will be the impact of the work from home transition on office occupancy.

I think it’s a matter of planning and investing where the money will be best served.

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Countdown to mandatory hotel quarantine

When an economy starts slipping people may still be going out to eat or shopping but the first luxury they cut is travelling.

And one of the industries that feels that impact most closely are hotels.

With a lot of news focussing on airlines, hotels appeared to be largely left out of federal aid until later stages of the pandemic.

With new national air travel quarantines coming into effect Feb. 22, will this act as a Band-Aid for struggling hotels?

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Can Canada’s oldest retailer hang on?

From fur trading to e-commerce, the oldest and most resilient retailer in Canada has been the Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) since 1670.

The company’s roots go back so far, they pre-date Confederation by nearly 200 years.

If ever there was an example of reinvention, over and over again, it will never be said that this retailer went down without a fight.

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First to close and last to open

It feels like 2020 has been the longest year on record for everyone.

Things are hardly back to normal by any standard, but it has been encouraging to see the buzz of back to school shoppers and the community embracing dining out again.

As we enter the last quarter of the year, it’s important to remember that there are some industries stuck in limbo, such as any facility that hosts crowds.

What does the future hold for entertainment venues?

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